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Topics - Snow Leopard

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Journal Announcements / "Cattails" now online
« on: June 02, 2015, 03:47:05 AM »
The new edition of “Cattails” is now online. 

You can read it here:   http://www.unitedhaikuandtankasociety.com/cattails.html




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ATPO Special Feature: Myths and the Creative Imagination Now Online


http://atlaspoetica.org/?page_id=1382

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Myths and the Creative Imagination


IN CONTEMPORARY TIMES A MYTH IS PERCEIVED AS A FALSEHOOD, SELF-DELUDING, SOMETHING THAT IS NOT TRUE. However, myths have been a part of human civilization from the earliest times.

The Scottish anthropologist James Frazer saw myths as pre-scientific attempts to explain the natural world.
Mircea Eliade, a historian of religion and myths, took a wider perspective. He defined myths as stories of origins, of how the world and everything in it came to be. Therefore, myths are basic tools humans use to make sense of our world and who we are.

Joseph Campbell extended this creative aspect of myths, when he said that the first function of a myth is to reconcile waking consciousness to ‘the mysterium tremendum et fascinans of this universe’. In other words, myths point people to the metaphysical dimension of their existence – the origins and nature of the cosmos.

The psychoanalytical interpretation of myths as expressions of the human psyche in the works of Freud and Jung was one of the most influential theories of the 20th century.

Freud focused on the ritual significance of myths. In his study, Totem and Taboo (1912-13) he compared taboo beliefs to neurosis and concluded that individual neurosis and social taboos have psychological roots.

Jung’s interpretation of myths has particular significance for the creative imagination. According to him an individual is on a quest for self-realization. He called this the ‘individuation process’. Myths provide the blueprint for this quest. Myths emerge from the unconscious and contain archaic truths about existence and are our fundamental source of inspiration. Jung argued myths contain messages to the individuals, not the group, no matter how many people are involved in retelling and listening to them. ‘Myths are first and foremost psychic phenomena that reveal the nature of the soul.’

The power of myths to open up the world of imagination (Samuel Taylor Coleridge) is undeniable. However, the fate of myths has not been a happy one. Ironically, the critique of myths began in Greece, where myths inspired epic poetry, tragedy, comedy and visual arts. The Greeks subjected myths to a long and penetrating analysis as a result of which myths were radically demystified. This was influenced by the rise of schools of thoughts like Ionian Rationalism and the Materialists. Democritus criticized the gods in the works of Homer and Hesiod as being “capricious, unjust, immoral, jealous and vindictive”.

Christianity continued this demystification to undermine paganism. However by destroying myths as pagan falsehood, Christianity damaged the belief in the interaction between the cosmic and the natural world. The steady disjunction between myths and the individual took a particular turn in modern times as disenchantment. It forced poets and writers to create their own private imaginative worlds and present it to a frequently uncomprehending public.

Rilke was one such disenchanted poet who resurrected the myth of Orpheus in his 55 Sonnets to Orpheus (1922). WB Yeats similarly turned to the ancient Celtic myths for inspiration. TS Eliot drew on James Frazer’s study of comparative religions and myths, for his Waste Land.

How important are the religious/sacred aspects of myths to your own inspiration?
Do you think that these are relevant in our times for poets and writers?
Do you draw on any mythic traditions to write?

Myths and the Creative Imagination will be published as a Special Feature on the Atlas Poetica website at: http://atlaspoetica.org/?page_id=136 The general guidelines for Atlas Poetica apply. Myths and the Creative Imagination will publish spring, 2015.

Please submit up to five of your tanka about myths that have a special resonance for you. Only one tanka per individual poet will be selected, so please send us your best poems. The poems must be original, previously unpublished and not under consideration by any other journal. Poems posted in social media fora like twitter, facebook or personal blogs will be considered.

Send submissions to [email protected] with the subject line: “Submission – “Myths and the Creative Imagination.” Please send your tanka in the body of the email and include a brief  (not more than 5-lines) bio-note about your writing. Do not send attachments, which will be deleted.

Submission opens :1st December 2014. Deadline: 28th February 2015.

Acceptance or non-acceptance of submissions will be notified as soon as possible after the deadline.

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Other Haiku News / November 'Writing the Difficult Thing' Per Diem
« on: November 01, 2014, 01:34:10 PM »
Writing the Difficult Thing

MANY WRITERS ATTEST TO THE INHERENT DIFFICULTY IN THE ACT OF WRITING.  George Orwell said, ‘Writing is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout of some painful illness. One would never undertake such a thing, if one were not driven on by some demon whom one can neither resist nor understand.’

 However, there is another kind of difficulty: that of writing about ‘harrowing’ and ‘dark’ subjects where words themselves break down. This is an instance where the diabolic appears to have entered into the human life.

Adorno feared that, when faced with the ultimate evil, the resources of culture and art are no longer adequate. In his words:
‘To write a poem after Auschwitz is barbaric, and that corrodes also the knowledge which expresses why it has become impossible to write poetry today.’

Kafka understood well this blackness when he described writing as ‘the descent into the cold abyss of oneself.’ Yet, writing the difficult thing defines the very creed of the writer.

Anaïs Nin said:
‘The role of a writer is not to say what we all can say, but what we are unable to say.’

This Per Diem collection is now online: http://www.thehaikufoundation.org/

It features thought-provoking and powerful poems by well-known and up-coming poets throughout the month.




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Other Haiku News / Jane Reichhold
« on: October 16, 2014, 11:38:13 AM »
Hello,

Does anyone have any news about Jane? How is she? Is LYNX to continue?

Would be grateful for some information.


Snow Leopard

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Journal Announcements / Atlas Poetica Special Feature Online
« on: February 02, 2014, 07:35:51 AM »
Atlas Poetica Special Feature: Geography and the Creative Imagination is now online: http://atlaspoetica.org/?page_id=1011

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Journal Announcements / Notes From the Gean?
« on: December 11, 2013, 07:43:21 AM »
Links to the NFTG lead to a "free domain" up for sale.

Has anybody heard from Colin?

I hope he is okay.

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Geography and the Creative Imagination: Call for Submissions


Edited by Sonam Chhoki
 
WHETHER FICTIONAL OR REAL, geography plays an important part in bringing the world of a writer or poet to the reader. Here are some writers who used the landscape as a signature feature in their writing:
 
Longchenpa, the Tibetan Buddhist philosopher and teacher (1308–1364) was exiled to Bhutan and wrote a poetic eulogy of the valley of Bumthang in central Bhutan, where he lived for a decade. He evoked the physical beauty of Bumthang in the tradition of a ‘Hidden Land’ where Buddhism was protected and flourished. He called it a ‘paradise transplanted from heaven to earth.’

Thomas Hardy (1840–1928) based his Wessex roughly on King Alfred’s Anglo-Saxon kingdom in western England. Covering wild moors, water meadows, craggy cliffs and the wind-swept Salisbury Plains, Wessex embraces contemporary Dorset, Berkshire, Hampshire, Wiltshire, Somerset and Devon.

Here protagonists play out their love trysts, betrayals and tragic deaths against a background of enormous economic and social changes—the railway reached Dorchester, Hardy’s Casterbridge, when he was seven years old.

The Indian writer, Premchand (1880–1936) turned away from themes of courtly love, heroic adventures and epic tales to the lives of ordinary people in his rural home province of Uttar Pradesh. His villages are terra firma where protagonists encounter debt, the travails of large joint families, the rigidity of the caste system, and the corruption and tyranny of the local landlords, the Zamindars.

R. K. Narayan (1906–2001) invented an imaginary town, Malgudi in South India. He says:
‘Malgudi is . . . not to be found on any map . . . If I explain that Malgudi is a small town in South India, I shall only be expressing a half-truth, for the characteristics of Malgudi seem to me universal.’

Matsuo Basho (1644–1694) was not ordained as a monk but he was steeped in Zen Buddhism. The old Zen Masters undertook journeys with all the hazards, including that of death. Basho followed in their footsteps. He created a new prose form, the haibun (a prose written in the spirit of the haiku), to record his impressions. His most famous haibun, The Narrow Road to the Deep North, takes contemporary pilgrims through Sugmo (Tokyo), Asaka (Fukushima) and up to Sendhai.

Patrick Leigh Fermor (1915– ) began his travels across Europe in 1933 with a knapsack of a few clothes, the Oxford Book of English Verse and a volume of Horace’s Odes. His travels throughout Greece made him an authority on Hellenic culture. He created the persona of a bookish wanderer in the wild. Mani, Travels in the Southern Peloponnese and Roumeli are his well-known books. He influenced a generation of contemporary travel writers.

Lawrence Durrell said that there is a spirit of a place that a writer can tap into.
 
How does locality influence your writing?
Do you fictionalize locality for purposes of your writing?
Are you influenced by any particular region or place?
Have you written about such a special place?
 
Geography and the Creative Imagination will be published as a Special Feature on the Atlas Poetica website at: http://atlaspoetica.org/?p=943. The general guidelines for Atlas Poetica apply. Geography and the Creative Imagination will publish Spring, 2014.

Please submit up to five of your tanka about a place that is special to you. Only one tanka per individual poet will be selected, so please send us your best poems. The poems must be original, previously unpublished and not under consideration by any other journal. Poems posted in social media fora such as twitter, facebook or personal blogs will be considered.

Send submissions to [email protected] with the subject line: “Submission– Geography and the Creative Imagination”. Please send your tanka in the body of the email. Do not send attachments, which will be deleted. Please include a brief  (not more than 5-lines) bio-note about your writing.
 
Submission deadline: 30th December 2013.

Acceptance or non-acceptance of submissions will be notified as soon as possible after the deadline.

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Journal Announcements / Summer Edition of Kernelsonline
« on: July 29, 2013, 11:34:24 AM »
The summer 2013 edition of kernelsonline is now online.

http://www.kernelsonline.com/

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