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Messages - Snow Leopard

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1
Journal Announcements / "Cattails" now online
« on: June 02, 2015, 03:47:05 AM »
The new edition of “Cattails” is now online. 

You can read it here:   http://www.unitedhaikuandtankasociety.com/cattails.html




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Thank you for dropping by Marion C. I agree, the poets showcased in this special feature write of a fascinating range of myths. :)

Quote from: Seaview
Some lovely work in here, Snow - thanks for sharing :)

marion


Snow Leopard

3
ATPO Special Feature: Myths and the Creative Imagination Now Online


http://atlaspoetica.org/?page_id=1382

4
Last Call for Submission

Just a few more days to the deadline: : 28th February 2015

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Hi Alan,

Great idea. :) Not sure if any of these haiku of mine fit the bill.:


meatless month -*
the butcher too lights
butter lamps

*Meatless month: The sale and consumption of meat is banned in Bhutan during the sacred 1st and 4th months of the Bhutanese lunar calendar and other sacred occasions like the Descending Day of the Buddha, the 8th, 15th and 30th of  every month.

From the haibun titled, Will the Lotus Bloom? Frogpond Spring/Summer issue, 2011

...............

the night still to come
a comma after Venus
first crescent at dusk 

From the haibun, The Wisdom of the Dark, CHO July 1, 2012, vol 8, no 2.

................

late night radio—
side by side two spiders
walking the ceiling
From the Haibun Bad Legs and other things, Haibun Today,  Volume 5, Number 1, march 2011.

................

night border crossing --
the elephant calf holds
his mother's tail

Shamrock 26 2013, Touchstone Individual Poem Award, 2013

.............

stolen wombs -
the wind brings only dust
to the village well

 Haiku News Vol 2. No 8. 2013, also as haiga in Chrysanthemum 14 2013 and Haiku 21 anthology 2014

................

toddler's yawn . . .
in Tsechu* masks of gods
monks leap and swirl

*Tsechu (Dzongkha TSE-CHOO): Mask dance festival is a seasonal event held in spring, autumn and winter.

Simply Haiku, Spring 2011 Volume 9 No 1


Snow Leopard






6
Hello,

If you're looking for a challenge to stimulate you in the year just begun, give this Special Feature a try.

The Atlas Poetica (ATPO) Special Feature editions showcase a good range of well-known poets and new talent.

Myths and the Creative Imagination will be published as a Special Feature on the Atlas Poetica website at: http://atlaspoetica.org/?page_id=136 The general guidelines for Atlas Poetica apply. Myths and the Creative Imagination will publish spring, 2015.

Please submit up to five of your tanka about myths that have a special resonance for you. Only one tanka per individual poet will be selected, so please send us your best poems. The poems must be original, previously unpublished and not under consideration by any other journal. Poems posted in social media fora like twitter, facebook or personal blogs will be considered.

Send submissions to [email protected] with the subject line: “Submission – “Myths and the Creative Imagination.” Please send your tanka in the body of the email and include a brief  (not more than 5-lines) bio-note about your writing. Do not send attachments, which will be deleted.

Deadline approaching: 28th February 2015.

Acceptance or non-acceptance of submissions will be notified as soon as possible after the deadline.

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To give some idea of what the special feature is looking for in the poet's brief bio-note, here's a link:

http://atlaspoetica.org/?page_id=1011

The bio-note should be in third person and focus on the writing.


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Myths and the Creative Imagination


IN CONTEMPORARY TIMES A MYTH IS PERCEIVED AS A FALSEHOOD, SELF-DELUDING, SOMETHING THAT IS NOT TRUE. However, myths have been a part of human civilization from the earliest times.

The Scottish anthropologist James Frazer saw myths as pre-scientific attempts to explain the natural world.
Mircea Eliade, a historian of religion and myths, took a wider perspective. He defined myths as stories of origins, of how the world and everything in it came to be. Therefore, myths are basic tools humans use to make sense of our world and who we are.

Joseph Campbell extended this creative aspect of myths, when he said that the first function of a myth is to reconcile waking consciousness to ‘the mysterium tremendum et fascinans of this universe’. In other words, myths point people to the metaphysical dimension of their existence – the origins and nature of the cosmos.

The psychoanalytical interpretation of myths as expressions of the human psyche in the works of Freud and Jung was one of the most influential theories of the 20th century.

Freud focused on the ritual significance of myths. In his study, Totem and Taboo (1912-13) he compared taboo beliefs to neurosis and concluded that individual neurosis and social taboos have psychological roots.

Jung’s interpretation of myths has particular significance for the creative imagination. According to him an individual is on a quest for self-realization. He called this the ‘individuation process’. Myths provide the blueprint for this quest. Myths emerge from the unconscious and contain archaic truths about existence and are our fundamental source of inspiration. Jung argued myths contain messages to the individuals, not the group, no matter how many people are involved in retelling and listening to them. ‘Myths are first and foremost psychic phenomena that reveal the nature of the soul.’

The power of myths to open up the world of imagination (Samuel Taylor Coleridge) is undeniable. However, the fate of myths has not been a happy one. Ironically, the critique of myths began in Greece, where myths inspired epic poetry, tragedy, comedy and visual arts. The Greeks subjected myths to a long and penetrating analysis as a result of which myths were radically demystified. This was influenced by the rise of schools of thoughts like Ionian Rationalism and the Materialists. Democritus criticized the gods in the works of Homer and Hesiod as being “capricious, unjust, immoral, jealous and vindictive”.

Christianity continued this demystification to undermine paganism. However by destroying myths as pagan falsehood, Christianity damaged the belief in the interaction between the cosmic and the natural world. The steady disjunction between myths and the individual took a particular turn in modern times as disenchantment. It forced poets and writers to create their own private imaginative worlds and present it to a frequently uncomprehending public.

Rilke was one such disenchanted poet who resurrected the myth of Orpheus in his 55 Sonnets to Orpheus (1922). WB Yeats similarly turned to the ancient Celtic myths for inspiration. TS Eliot drew on James Frazer’s study of comparative religions and myths, for his Waste Land.

How important are the religious/sacred aspects of myths to your own inspiration?
Do you think that these are relevant in our times for poets and writers?
Do you draw on any mythic traditions to write?

Myths and the Creative Imagination will be published as a Special Feature on the Atlas Poetica website at: http://atlaspoetica.org/?page_id=136 The general guidelines for Atlas Poetica apply. Myths and the Creative Imagination will publish spring, 2015.

Please submit up to five of your tanka about myths that have a special resonance for you. Only one tanka per individual poet will be selected, so please send us your best poems. The poems must be original, previously unpublished and not under consideration by any other journal. Poems posted in social media fora like twitter, facebook or personal blogs will be considered.

Send submissions to [email protected] with the subject line: “Submission – “Myths and the Creative Imagination.” Please send your tanka in the body of the email and include a brief  (not more than 5-lines) bio-note about your writing. Do not send attachments, which will be deleted.

Submission opens :1st December 2014. Deadline: 28th February 2015.

Acceptance or non-acceptance of submissions will be notified as soon as possible after the deadline.

9
Other Haiku News / November 'Writing the Difficult Thing' Per Diem
« on: November 01, 2014, 01:34:10 PM »
Writing the Difficult Thing

MANY WRITERS ATTEST TO THE INHERENT DIFFICULTY IN THE ACT OF WRITING.  George Orwell said, ‘Writing is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout of some painful illness. One would never undertake such a thing, if one were not driven on by some demon whom one can neither resist nor understand.’

 However, there is another kind of difficulty: that of writing about ‘harrowing’ and ‘dark’ subjects where words themselves break down. This is an instance where the diabolic appears to have entered into the human life.

Adorno feared that, when faced with the ultimate evil, the resources of culture and art are no longer adequate. In his words:
‘To write a poem after Auschwitz is barbaric, and that corrodes also the knowledge which expresses why it has become impossible to write poetry today.’

Kafka understood well this blackness when he described writing as ‘the descent into the cold abyss of oneself.’ Yet, writing the difficult thing defines the very creed of the writer.

Anaïs Nin said:
‘The role of a writer is not to say what we all can say, but what we are unable to say.’

This Per Diem collection is now online: http://www.thehaikufoundation.org/

It features thought-provoking and powerful poems by well-known and up-coming poets throughout the month.




10
Other Haiku News / Re: Jane Reichhold
« on: October 18, 2014, 11:17:42 AM »
Hi Sandra,

Thank you for your detailed response to my post. Yes, I missed the information about Jane and Werner given earlier So kind of you to include the link for the Haiku Happenings page. I will make time to browse it. :)

I am delighted that Jane has recovered and that she and Werner are pursuing their interests.

Hopefully LYNX will find a new team.

Snow Leopard




11
Other Haiku News / Re: Jane Reichhold
« on: October 18, 2014, 11:12:33 AM »
Dear Alan,

Thank you for replying to my post. I am delighted that Jane is fine. She and Werner were one of a kind and I remember their kindness and encouragement during their stewardship of LYNX.


Jane is fine!  :)

Lynx had its final issue.  Jane and Werner are involved in new writing adventures, and of course the Aha! Forum is alive and kicking.
Alan

That would be wonderful -  a haijin meeting of minds in person!  I hope your 'plot' succeeds. :)

Quote
I'm still plotting how to meet Jane one day as she lives right in the middle of nowhere, and I live in England. ;)

Warm regards,

Snow Leopard

12
Other Haiku News / Jane Reichhold
« on: October 16, 2014, 11:38:13 AM »
Hello,

Does anyone have any news about Jane? How is she? Is LYNX to continue?

Would be grateful for some information.


Snow Leopard

13
New to Haiku: Free Discussion Area / Re: tanka prose/ haiku
« on: May 30, 2014, 05:01:17 PM »
Hello Urszula,

Welcome to the forum. :)

The haiku prose is called haibun. There are some stimulating definitions of this form in the HSA site and also in Contemporary Haibun Online.

Re your draft - your descriptions of the Polish Vigilia is a wonderful window to your world and I don't think readers are alienated by such original and different themes and topics.

In terms of the techniques of haibun I think the prose is a little too brief. Why not add a few descriptions of the family around the table, perhaps the tableware you use (candles, plants, any special color scheme which have a significance for this celebration etc.) perhaps you have someone presiding over the table, prayers said, special dishes served. Is this an annual family get-together? Some descriptions of these details would enrich your prose passage and give the reader a vivid sense of your celebration. 100-150 words is not uncommon for a short haibun.

I like you haiku very much. :)

Here are some links to the major haibun journals on line:

A Hundred Gourds: http://www.ahundredgourds.com/ahg32/index_haibun.html

CatTails: http://www.unitedhaikuandtankasociety.com/haibun142=1.html

Contemporary Haibun Online : http://contemporaryhaibunonline.com/

Haibun Today: http://haibuntoday.com/

Icebox Haiku: http://hailhaiku.wordpress.com/ This has two parts (if you like) the winning haibun (s) of the contests: Kikakuza and Genjuan.

Frogpond: http://www.hsa-haiku.org/frogpond/2014-issue37-1/haibun.html (This gives a few samples and not all the haibun featured in its current issues).


The haibun is a wonderful and rewarding form. I wish you all the best in your exploration of this form. :)


Snow Leopard







14
Other Haiku News / Re: Please please help
« on: March 25, 2014, 09:22:27 PM »
This is shocking news.

As editor of Presence, Martin has been always kind and helpful in dealing with submissions.

Hoping for his safe return.


Snow Leopard


15
Hi Sergio,

This is wonderful news. Congratulations. :)

I hope your success continues for many, many moons to come.


Snow Leopard

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