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Messages - John McManus

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151
Sails / Re: Sailing 14: What kind of sword do you carry?
« on: March 13, 2011, 04:40:46 AM »
not meaning to jump on the bandwagon, but I agree with Sandra alot of Peter's work is full of vigourous language. I think this one from the last issue of roadrunner is a good example

 
gored but out of these shattered ribs a bull


-John

152
Sails / Re: Sailing 14: What kind of sword do you carry?
« on: March 13, 2011, 02:09:55 AM »
Lorin's post was an excellent read, this is how I interpreted McClintock's haiku.

For me the first line clearly shows a little inn, now when I think about a little inn I think of it as being a rather modest or cheap establishment, (perhaps, because I live in a town full of b&b's.) but even though the inn is cheap to stay at we find ourselves outside, staring up at the swinging sign board, which indicates to me a kind of groaning noise (creating a sense of despair.)

I think it's also worth noting that there seems to be only one person outside the inn, which must logically bring in to play some sense of loneliness that is further intensified by the concluding evening chill.

So now not only do we have the physical ordeal of being outside in the cold when we would much rather be inside but also we have the longing for company and perhaps the warmth of a smile.

-John   

153
Journal Announcements / Re: Haijinx open for submissions
« on: March 02, 2011, 03:32:17 PM »
I'm sure it will be an awesome read if the last editon was anything to go by. I personally can't wait to see it. Many thanks to you and Mark for all your hard work!   

154
In-Depth Haiku: Free Discussion Area / Re: Is the Clock Ticking on Haiku?
« on: February 13, 2011, 03:13:46 PM »
A bit off topic here, but thanks Alan for all those Helen Buckingham haiku. I am a big fan of Helen's and always left in awe of her skill.

155
In-Depth Haiku: Free Discussion Area / Re: Is the Clock Ticking on Haiku?
« on: February 12, 2011, 01:23:10 AM »
Hi Don I see your point, but I feel Gabi's sensei has hit the nail on the head when he said his students should try to do something unexpected with the kigo/fragment or whatever anyone wants to call it.

So often you see haiku that let's the phrasal part of the poem be dictated to by the fragment but it is possible if you ponder on it long enough for you to come up with a phrase that changes the original meaning of the fragment thus allowing people to see yet another angle.     

John :)

156
In-Depth Haiku: Free Discussion Area / Re: Lost and Found in Translation
« on: February 08, 2011, 04:03:40 PM »
Thank you Lorin, for your informative and on point response.

I was mulling over the whole Kigo debate in my head and am still intrigued by the idea of a list of celebratory days, traditions and images that can anchor particular facets of british culture into a seasonal reference for british haiku writers. But as I say in previous posts it would have to be discussed at greater lengths with people within the british haiku community who are far wiser and cleverer than myself on such matters.

  

157
In-Depth Haiku: Free Discussion Area / Re: Lost and Found in Translation
« on: February 08, 2011, 02:04:37 AM »
Lorin, I can see by your posts you are very passionate on this subject.

I am not going to pretend to have a broad working knowledge on the inner workings of kigo. What I was thinking when I was discussing with Alan the possibilities of a unified british saijiki was if we were going to try to compile a saijiki it would be best to do it through an official body like the BHS and discussed at greater length by my elder and betters so that we may kickstart our own poetic traditons within british haiku instead of getting accused of stealing/borrowing/imitating or corrupting others.

   

158
In-Depth Haiku: Free Discussion Area / Re: Lost and Found in Translation
« on: February 07, 2011, 06:50:53 PM »
We could always get lucky Alan and one of us win the lottery (not that I ever play the bloody thing, but we can all dream of one day stumbling upon a winning ticket!)

I will check it out with the BHS, and see what comes of it.

There are some very interesting points being posted. Very educational for one as green as I.

159
In-Depth Haiku: Free Discussion Area / Re: Lost and Found in Translation
« on: February 07, 2011, 06:35:15 PM »
Is there no way of doing an official british saijiki through the BHS if the intention is to have an official and unified source.   

160
In-Depth Haiku: Free Discussion Area / Re: Lost and Found in Translation
« on: February 07, 2011, 06:26:45 PM »
That is a really good idea Alan. Just wondering though with all the regional accents and dialects in England and other parts of Britain whether there would have to be certain ground rules to establishing an ofiicial english or british kigo list 

161
New to Haiku: Free Discussion Area / Re: a question for the mentors
« on: February 07, 2011, 02:47:06 PM »
Hi Josie, I can't give you any better advice than what you have already received.

All I can say is that if you find haiku or any other form of poetry that appeals to you on a personal level, you should contemplate what it is that you admire about it in particular? Figure out what aspects intrigue you, if you do this Josie you can perhaps understand better how to express yourself whether it be through haiku or any other form you decide to persue.

All the best, John.     

162
In-Depth Haiku: Free Discussion Area / Re: Lost and Found in Translation
« on: February 05, 2011, 06:13:31 PM »
I must confess I am unfamiliar with Ms. Mayuzumi and her work.

If she does want EL haiku to be 17 syllables with use of kigo from a saijiki then I think she is missing the point of multiculturalism within poetry, surely the beauty of english haiku is that we are able to put a different spin on what we perceive a haiku to be. Don't get me wrong I understand the need to aspire to the many virtues of what makes japanese haiku so wonderful, but not at the sake of ignoring our own culutral identities and afilliations.   

163
In-Depth Haiku: Free Discussion Area / Re: Favorite ku of 2010?
« on: February 04, 2011, 04:23:37 PM »
Without a doubt my favourite haiku of 2010 was Billie Wilson's

campfire sparks
someone outside the circle
starts another song

The reason is that it is deeply atmospheric. As I read it I longed to feel the warnth of that campfire, to be a part of that special moment where friendship and song meets, to feel that suprise of someone not within the group joining in and adding to the experience. The haiku is crafted with great skill and is the kind of poem I really admire.

164
New to Haiku: Free Discussion Area / Re: Haiku for eReaders?
« on: February 01, 2011, 01:45:58 AM »
I like your pondering Don. You certainly raise a very good point.

As far as buying haiku books I personally don't but any haiku books without having seen a decent review of it in a reputable blog, webzine or journal.

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