News:

If you click the "Log In" button and get an error, use this URL to display the forum home page: https://thehaikufoundation.org/forum_sm/

Update any bookmarks you have for the forum to use this URL--not a similar URL that includes "www."
___________
Welcome to The Haiku Foundation forum! Some features and boards are available only to registered members who are logged in. To register, click Register in the main menu below. Click Login to login. Please use a Report to Moderator link to report any problems with a board or a topic.

Main Menu

Headnotes for haiku or Haibun?

Started by AlanSummers, May 01, 2015, 12:30:37 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

AlanSummers

Hi Jan


Quote from: Jan Benson on September 12, 2015, 08:17:55 AM
This has been informative, and I hope my delayed questions are not too late to be considered.

Moving through several threads before landing on this one, I too, notice a more lenient approach to the process of writing the Japanese forms in English, compared to American specific teachings. Especially structuring haiku, but also on the creation of haibun and haiga.

Unfortunately too many schools, colleges, and universities insist on teaching haiku and related arts incorrectly.  There are a great many of us who honour and push for a better understanding.

Quote
Perhaps in the USA, we are "industrialized" in most disciplines. We are easily qued up, and readily adapt to formations and formulas.


There is a worry that bodies of learning are over corporate in nature and churning out courses for finance first and deeper understanding second or third.

It's the nature of big organisms to tamper thoughts and acts ever since a few Athenian businessmen invented democracy and were horrified when Socrates took it so seriously and enabled the future generations into being able to articulate mentally and verbally and artistically, and we have this dumbing across, and inclination to control people.


Quote
In this more rigid environment, breaking free of convention is a bit of a challenge, if rewarding.

Haiku has certainly done this as it takes to the streets!   It's out of control of the large institutions. :-)

Quote

Alan, I appreciate most your clarification regarding the placement of verse within the haiga or shahai, as I have seen the haiku placed underneath the artwork and photographs in some postings.

I'm proud that the very first shahai course was so successful, and we have just announced, with my With Words hat, our second ground-breaking course.   The effects of the first and the second courses will show through in the following years to come. :)

I know first hand how the public at large really appreciate art that combines text and haiku is an incredible venue for this collaboration.

Quote

Question.
About three years ago I stopped in to look at postings on NaHaiWriMo, to find folks post at will, with occasional helpful feedback. Above, in your comments, you mention posting your work on that blog. I am hesitant to post there because I worry editors are watching, and may consider one's postings on the site to be "previously published" work.

Myself, Mark Brooks as Haijinx founding editors actively engaged with NaHaiWriMo posters in asking permission to publish their work.  Also the two of us were in dialog with Michael Dylan Welch and the result was that Frogpond would accept NaHaiWriMo posters' work.

Some print and online publications may not accept work on social media, so very close reading of their submission information is vital.

Alas Haijinx is not with us,  but as a founding editor of Bones Journal, although I stepped down this year, after a number of great issues, I'm with fellow NaHaiWriMo poster Johannes Bjerg that good work on social media should have the opportunity to have their work seen who are not necessarily regular social media observers.

Check submission policies very closely and in detail.


Quote
Alan, can you speak to the benefits of participating on such an active site as NaHaiWriMo?
And any cautions you may offer?

Jan in Texas

This is what I said at NaHaiWriMo:

QuoteAlan Summers Haijinx was one of the first magazines to not only publish NaHaiWriMo haiku, but actively contact authors within seconds, if not minutes if they could have them considered.
January 30, 2012 at 5:29pm
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:9MzrcWY42V4J:https://www.facebook.com/NaHaiWriMo/posts/279494088782346+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=uk&client=safari

and

QuoteAlan Summers In fact on the contributers listings you can see which haiku are from NaHaiWriMo: http://www.haijinx.org/IV-1/contributors.html
haijinx IV:1 contributors
Melissa Allen — news editor haiku: radiation leak haiku: hair in the drain haiku: earthquake news haiku: summer heat haiku: summer dusknews section: a jumble of flowers editors: Melissa's page (recent haiku & haiga) Don Baird...

January 30, 2012 at 5:32pm

In fact Melissa Allen who myself and Mark Brooks nabbed very early on in her career is now an editor at Bones Journal. :)

Enjoy the other posts on this cached weblink. :)

The site is much quieter recently, so read magazine submission policies carefully but consider posting at NaHaiWriMo.   It's created a great wave of strong writers and helped change the face of haiku.  It can again.   

warm regards,

Alan



QUOTE IN FULL
Quote from: Jan Benson on September 12, 2015, 08:17:55 AM
This has been informative, and I hope my delayed questions are not too late to be considered.

Moving through several threads before landing on this one, I too, notice a more lenient approach to the process of writing the Japanese forms in English, compared to American specific teachings. Especially structuring haiku, but also on the creation of haibun and haiga.

Perhaps in the USA, we are "industrialized" in most disciplines. We are easily qued up, and readily adapt to formations and formulas.
In this more rigid environment, breaking free of convention is a bit of a challenge, if rewarding.

Alan, I appreciate most your clarification regarding the placement of verse within the haiga or shahai, as I have seen the haiku placed underneath the artwork and photographs in some postings.

Question.
About three years ago I stopped in to look at postings on NaHaiWriMo, to find folks post at will, with occasional helpful feedback. Above, in your comments, you mention posting your work on that blog. I am hesitant to post there because I worry editors are watching, and may consider one's postings on the site to be "previously published" work.
Alan, can you speak to the benefits of participating on such an active site as NaHaiWriMo?
And any cautions you may offer?

Jan in Texas
Alan Summers,
founder, Call of the Page
https://www.callofthepage.org

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk