Author Topic: American sentences  (Read 1834 times)

Lorraine Pester

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American sentences
« on: October 07, 2017, 07:00:34 PM »
I was first introduced to one line poetry about eight years ago. They were said to be patterned after Allen Ginsberg’s Howl. They had seventeen syllables, the two parts of phrase and _____, and a jux. Is this still acceptable or old-fashioned?

Seaview (Marion Clarke)

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Re: American sentences
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2017, 02:04:27 AM »
Hi Lorraine,

For the second time this morning, on researching a haiku-related subject I am directed to an article on Alan Summer's blog Area 17 - no doubt because he has so much experience on the subject, but also because he so kindly shares his knowledge with others.

In this piece he discusses the structure of one line haiku/monoku/monostich. I find one-liners very satisfying to write and in the past have followed the unwritten rule that Alan refers to; if a haiku can easily be split into the more traditional three-line format, it shouldn't be written as a monoku. But I see he says that this isn't necessarily the case all the time. Enjoy the read :)

marion

http://area17.blogspot.co.uk/2016/12/travelling-single-line-of-haiku-one.html

Seaview (Marion Clarke)

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Re: American sentences
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2017, 02:13:53 AM »
Thanks to Martin Gottlieb Cohen who recently posted this link in another thread on one liner haiku which might also be of interest, Lorraine.

http://simplyhaiku.com/SHv2n5/haikuclinic/haikuclinic.html

Lorraine Pester

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Re: American sentences
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2017, 06:54:44 AM »
Thanks for the links, marion

Anna

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Re: American sentences
« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2017, 12:46:27 AM »
I was first introduced to one line poetry about eight years ago. They were said to be patterned after Allen Ginsberg’s Howl. They had seventeen syllables, the two parts of phrase and _____, and a jux. Is this still acceptable or old-fashioned?


I only came to the one liner thru haiku, but yes, there seems to be some correlation...and yes, AG's American sentences is often very haiku like,

considering that haiku can be read in one breath length, maybe that is one possible way of looking at AG's American sentences.

Which leads me to further the discussion and ask you: if something is say 17 syllable length, does it qualify to be a one line haiku?
If so, why

If not, why?


hmm m
If anyone comes, / Turn into frogs, / O cooling melons!

¬Issa

Anna

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Re: American sentences
« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2017, 12:51:10 AM »
I was first introduced to one line poetry about eight years ago. They were said to be patterned after Allen Ginsberg’s Howl. They had seventeen syllables, the two parts of phrase and _____, and a jux. Is this still acceptable or old-fashioned?

one other question:
what is old-fashioned?

because is that not how basic haiku are written by beginner's like me?

llllLlllaaaariyo, hmmm
If anyone comes, / Turn into frogs, / O cooling melons!

¬Issa

 

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